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Why Veterans Are a Great Fit for Franchises

Kitchen Tune-Up is proud to count 16 veterans among its franchise owners in 2020, and we are grateful they chose Kitchen Tune-Up as their next careers. Franchising success requires traits that veterans have in abundance. What makes franchising such a good match for veterans?

The military breeds a team mindset. Everyone at every level works together toward the same goal. That same team thinking applies to franchises, where the individual business is part of a larger operation that has rules, but also provides support. Veterans simply “get” the teamwork needed for a successful franchising relationship.

Franchises operate inside the “bounds of very specific brand-compliance and standards,” notes Kerry Crocco, writer for Franchise.com. Members of the military are used to meeting standards and working within established systems—all of which means that veterans transition well into the similar environment of franchising, Crocco says.


Veterans understand “why rules exist and the need to follow them,” notes Joel Libava, an advisor who writes about franchising for the federal government’s Small Business Administration.

Military training creates vets who tend to be disciplined and confident, and who are used to making and implementing plans. They appreciate being part of a larger organization. That’s all great preparation for making a franchise succeed. Libava adds that, as in the military, there are rules, training, and camaraderie, in “the ranks” of fellow franchisees.

What Should Vets Look For in a Franchise?

If you’re a veteran considering franchising, at Kitchen Tune-Up or anywhere else, be sure you know what you truly want from a new career as a franchisee. Do you want flexible hours, or a more set schedule? Work from home, or work in a business location? Travel—or no travel at all? Consider how being a business owner will change, or fit into, the lifestyle you want.

Take full advantage of all the training and advice available to you. Reach out to veteran-specific resources: One is the SBA’s Office of Veterans Business Development. Another is VetFran, a non-profit organization helping veterans interested in the franchise business model.

Do your homework. Investigate varied types of franchises to figure out what best fits your interests and needs, and your family’s expectations, too. Learn about the industry and its future prospects. Get solid financial advice. Ask companies to direct you to their franchisees who are veterans, and ask those vets how their military experience has transferred to their new careers.

And remember, your experience as a military veteran makes you a great candidate for a franchise like Kitchen Tune-Up.

Published: by Jill Hansen

Category: RecognitionVeterans